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Graphic Organizers

Graphic organizers have become very useful instructional tools. Most classrooms display graphics used for a variety of purposes. A graphic organizer can be used to help students:

Access a variety of graphic organizers from this website:
www.ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/issues/students/learning/lr1grorg.htm

New graphic organizers are constantly being developed. Teachers should make it a practice to check the various websites to see what is available for their use. For example, the site listed above includes some new graphic organizers including:

Using a Graphic Organizer to Explore Topics Related to a Theme

This is an extremely useful site for finding the exact type of graphic organizer to suit your purpose.

http://www.eduplace.com/graphicorganizer/

For example, the following graphic organizers would be useful in exploring topics related to a theme in history:

The type of graphic organizer you chose depends on the number of brainstorming ideas you want to generate and how you want to show the relationship of these ideas to each other. Seeing the ideas displayed on a graphic organizer often leads students to generate new ideas about how they want to approach the theme.

Graphic Organizers

A graphic organizer is an instructional tool used to illustrate a student or class's prior knowledge about a topic or section of text; specific examples include the K-W-L-H Technique and the Anticipation/Reaction Guide.:

Other sites for lists of graphic organizers include:

Graphic Organizers

Graphic organizers are an excellent way to organize information on a given topic. For this activity, we could use a simple chart like the one that follows.

 
Name 1
Name 2
Attribute 1    
Attribute 2    
Attribute 3    

We could also use an organizer that allows us to do some additional branching.

Used to describe a central idea: a thing (a geographic region), process (meiosis), concept (altruism), or proposition with support (experimental drugs should be available to AIDS victims). Key frame questions: What is the central idea? What are its attributes? What are its functions?

Other examples can be found at
http://www.ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/issues/students/learning/lr1grorg.htm

Graphic Organizers

Graphic organizers come in all shapes and forms and can be used for variety of purposes.

Find your favorite graphic organizer and detailed information about it at the following site:
http://www.graphic.org/goindex.html

Advanced Organizers

Advance organizers are a special form of graphic organizers. They do include such strategies as charts, diagrams, and concept maps usually labeled as “graphic organizers”. However, they may also include oral presentations and pictures containing context clues. What is the difference?

Advance organizers are used for a specific person – they connect new information to prior knowledge. We learn new things by relating them to concepts and skills that we are already familiar with. Specifically, they:

Graphic Organizers

Graphic organizers are usually pictures, diagrams or charts that help students organize thoughts and construct meaning. They can be used to help students organize and display a jumble of information. They can also be used by students to organize research questions or develop a plan for writing. Additional information about using graphic organizers can be found at.

http://www.fno.org/oct97/picture.html

Graphic Organizers

Graphic organizers are valuable instructional tools. Unlike many tools that just have one purpose, graphic organizers are flexible and endless in application. One common trait found among graphic organizers is that they show the order and completeness of a student's thought process - strengths and weaknesses of understanding become clearly evident. Many graphic organizers show different aspects of an issue/problem - in close and also big picture. Since many graphic organizers use short words or phrases, they are ideal for many types of learners, including English Language Learners with intermediate proficiency.

Although five main types of organizers are mentioned in this piece, many others exist, or will soon be created.

This site will provide some excellent examples of graphic organizers.

http://www.writedesignonline.com/organizers/

Graphic Organizers

Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, Pathways to School Improvement
http://www.ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/issues/students/learning/lr1grorg.htm.

A graphic organizer is an instructional tool used to illustrate a student or class's prior knowledge about a topic or section of text; specific examples include the K-W-L-H Technique and the Anticipation/Reaction Guide. Other organizers include the:

Used to describe a central idea: a thing (a geographic region), process (meiosis), concept (altruism), or proposition with support (experimental drugs should be available to AIDS victims). Key frame questions: What is the central idea? What are its attributes? What are its functions?

Used to describe the stages of something (the life cycle of a primate); the steps in a linear procedure (how to neutralize an acid); a sequence of events (how feudalism led to the formation of nation states); or the goals, actions, and outcomes of a historical figure or character in a novel (the rise and fall of Napoleon). Key frame questions: What is the object, procedure, or initiating event? What are the stages or steps? How do they lead to one another? What is the final outcome?

Used for time lines showing historical events or ages (grade levels in school), degrees of something (weight), shades of meaning (Likert scales), or ratings scales (achievement in school). Key frame questions: What is being scaled? What are the end points?

 
Name 1
Name 2
Attribute 1    
Attribute 2    
Attribute 3    

Used to show similarities and differences between two things (people, places, events, ideas, etc. the key frame question is: What things are being compared? How are they similar? How are they different?

Used to represent a problem, attempted solutions, and results (such as the national debt), the key frame questions are: What was the problem? Who had the problem? Why was it a problem? What attempts were made to solve the problem? Did those attempts succeed?

Used to show causal information (causes of poverty), a hierarchy (types of insects), or branching procedures (the circulatory system). Key frame questions: What is the super-ordinate category? What are the subordinate categories? How are they related? How many levels are there?

Used to show the nature of an interaction between persons or groups (such as Europeans settlers and American Indians), the key frame questions are: Who are the persons or groups? What were their goals? Did they conflict or cooperate? What was the outcome for each person or group?

Used to show the causal interaction of a complex event (such as an election, a nuclear explosion) or complex phenomenon (such as juvenile delinquency, learning disabilities). The key frame questions are: What are the factors that cause X? How do they interrelate? Are the factors that caused X the same as those that cause X to persist?

Used to show how a series of events interact to produce a set of results again and again (weather phenomena, cycles of achievement and failure, the life cycle). Key frame questions: What are the critical events in the cycle? How are they related? In what ways are they self-reinforcing?

Graphic Organizers/Webbing

The Compendium of Instructional Strategies provides a rationale for the use of graphic organizers.
http://home.earthlink.net/~jhholly/graphicorganizerswebbing.htm

Graphic Organizers / Webbing: A diagram that represents the relationships of ideas or information using words or abstract symbols. Graphic organizers assist students to:

  1. attend to and isolate important information;
  2. organize information into coherent structures;
  3. integrate information and see relationships between concepts and elements;
  4. clarify and synthesize component parts of larger concepts.

Teachers and students can use graphic organizers:

  1. to activate current knowledge;
  2. to present information or explain concepts;
  3. to take notes while listening, reading, or viewing;
  4. to organize and summarize information;
  5. to assess student learning.